Mind Altering Quotes by J. Krishnamurti on Human Conditioning & Suffering

Mind Altering Quotes by J. Krishnamurti on Human Conditioning & Suffering

Jiddu Krishnamurti nicknamed as “K” by his beloved audience, was one of the greatest philosophical and spiritual figures of the 20th century. Unlike other public figures, who call themselves mystics and delude people will their ideologies and narratives. K born in a minion village of Southern India never played the game. He was a simple man, who believed in the potential of the human mind and wanted us to be unconditionally free.

J. Krishnamurti “A Philosopher of its own Kind”

During his short lifetime, Krishnaji travelled around the world for nearly sixty years and addressed different audiences. Tackling a different issue each time, some of his best discourses held are on the– Nature of Mind, Thoughts, What is Love, Human Conditioning and on the Need for Psychological Revolution.

So as a random person on this random planet, learning from my randomness. I have found some truth bombs in K’s teachings that need to be pondered upon. If you too are a seeker of knowledge like me. Then you’ll love these Mind-Altering Quotes by J. Krishnamurti on Human Conditioning and Suffering.

Krishnamurti on Human Conditioning:

All of us have been trained by education and environment to seek personal gain and security and to fight for ourselves. Though we cover it over with pleasant phrases, we have been educated for various professions within a system which is based on exploitation and acquisitive fear.

To transform the world, we must begin with ourselves; and what is important in beginning with ourselves is the intention. The intention must be to understand ourselves and not to leave it to others to transform themselves or to bring about a modified change through revolution, either of the left or of the right. It is important to understand that this is our responsibility, yours and mine.

If you begin to understand what you are without trying to change it, then what you are undergoes a transformation.

What is needed, rather than running away or controlling or suppressing or any other resistance, is understanding fear; that means, watch it, learn about it, come directly into contact with it. We are to learn about fear, not how to escape from it.

In oneself lies the whole world and if you know how to look and learn, the door is there and the key is in your hand. Nobody on earth can give you either the key or the door to open, except yourself.

Have you ever asked yourselves what you are going to do when you grow up? In all likelihood you will get married, and before you know where you are, you will be mothers and fathers; and you will then be tied to a job, or to the kitchen, in which you will gradually wither away. Is that all that your life is going to be?

A consistent thinker is a thoughtless person, because he conforms to a pattern; he repeats phrases and thinks in a groove.

J. Krishnamurti on Human Suffering:

The constant assertion of belief is an indication of fear.

Do not think about yourself, but be aware of the thought, emotion, or action that makes you think of yourself.

The ending of sorrow is the beginning of wisdom. Knowledge is always within the shadow of ignorance. Meditation is freedom from thought and a movement in the ecstasy of truth. Meditation is explosion of intelligence.

The end is the beginning of all things, suppressed and hidden, awaiting to be released through the rhythm of pain and pleasure.

And the point is, is it possible for the mind to be totally free from suffering and yet not become indifferent, callous, irresponsible, but to have that passion, the intensity, the energy that freedom brings, freedom from suffering.

Pain itself destroys pain. Suffering itself frees man from suffering.

From these prejudices there arises conflict, transient joys and suffering. But we are unconscious of this, unconscious that we are slaves to certain forms of tradition, to social and political environment, to false values.

Human beings, each one, right through the world, go through great agonies, the more sensitive, the more alert, the more observant, the greater the suffering, the anxiety, the extraordinary sense of insoluble problems.

Sorrow is not in death but in loneliness, and conflict comes when you seek consolation, forgetfulness, explanations, and illusions.

Without freedom from the past, there is no freedom at all, because the mind is never new, fresh, innocent.

Krishnamurti on Mind, Fear and Trust:

The mind has to be empty to see clearly.

When we talk about understanding, surely it takes place only when the mind listens completely – the mind being your heart, your nerves, your ears – when you give your whole attention to it.

Begin where you are. Read every word, every phrase, every paragraph of the mind, as it operates through thought.

When one loses the deep intimate relationship with nature, then temples, mosques and churches become important.

What is needed, rather than running away or controlling or suppressing or any other resistance, is understanding fear; that means, watch it, learn about it, come directly into contact with it. We are to learn about fear, not how to escape from it.

The fact is there is nothing that you can trust; and that is a terrible fact, whether you like it or not. Psychologically there is nothing in the world, that you can put your faith, your trust, or your belief in. Neither your gods, nor your science can save you, can bring you psychological certainty; and you have to accept that you can trust in absolutely nothing.

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20 thoughts on “Mind Altering Quotes by J. Krishnamurti on Human Conditioning & Suffering”

  1. There is one line in this whole article that totally resonates with me otherwise most of it i think is beyond me.
    Thanks for such a beautiful article.

    1. Even I used to have the same thoughts. I’ve never been interested in listening or reading to anybody who calls himself or herself a Guru or mystic. But K never said that, he held strong views and never feared sharing them not matter how rigid a question may be. He merely observed himself and the environment around him and spoke fearlessly on it. I would prefer to call him a teacher. He truly deserves the title.

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